Garlic-Ginger Chicken & Broccoli

March 14, 2019lectinfreemama
Blog post

There’s something so…American…about getting Chinese takeout. When no one feels like cooking, it’s wok-fried food from a white cardboard box for dinner. And, of course, plastic-wrapped fortune cookies for dessert. And man, is it good (if you know where to get it).

But you’re eating the Plant Paradox way now and chances are, your local Chinese takeout isn’t using avocado oil and coconut aminos to fry up some pastured chicken and cauliflower rice.

Lectin-free chicken & broccoli stir fry compliant on phase 2 of The Plant Paradox diet.
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As luck of the dragon would have it, I have a lectin-free stir fry recipe with a marinade so good, you won’t miss pouring sugar-loaded brown sauce on your veggies and steamed rice. Instead of a fortune cookie, you’ll have the good fortune of healing your gut. And if you’re missing your Chinese takeout in a white cardboard box, you can even serve this in a takeout box from Amazon.

Tips for Making Lectin-Free Stir Fry

Chinese takeout is usually loaded with starch, sugar, and highly processed oils. Use these alternatives for a lectin-free stir fry that’s delicious and good for your body.

Where to Get Ingredients

I get almost all my specialty ingredients for Asian cuisine from Thrive Market. It’s like an online club store for discount lectin-free groceries. Things are much cheaper there than my local grocery store (or Amazon). Staples for a good lectin-free stir fry, like avocado oil, sesame oil, arrowroot starch, Lakanto monk fruit sweetener, shirataki rice, and even dry riced cauliflower are up to 50% less expensive. Use this link to get 25% off your first order.

Thrive Market

–> Get my entire Lectin-Free Pantry Checklist.

Where to Find Pastured Chicken

In colder climates, it’s near impossible to find chicken commercially that’s not been supplemented with grain or beans. You’ll have to do the best you can. I am a cold-climate dweller, so I find local farms that still allow their birds to roam (with shelter), but supplement with a feed that meets my personal standards (organic, non-GMO, soy-free, etc). Two good resources for finding local farms are eatwild.com and realmilk.com. Also, ask around at your local farmer’s market.

–> Get my A to Z Lectin-Free Ingredient Guide

Vegan & Vegetarian Options

Unfortunately, that quintessential substitute for meat in most Chinese takeout, tofu, is loaded with lectins. A better substitute is tempeh, because it’s fermented soy. Fermentation is the most effective method of denaturing lectins, approaching a 98% reduction at 72 hours. (1) Look for plain, organic (non-GMO) tempeh with no added grains. I find the Soyboy original flavor at my local grocery store (Wegmans). Vegetarians can also use Quorn chick’n tenders.

Soyboy vegan and vegetarian option for lectin-free stir fry

Broccoli

You’ve probably used broccoli florets in 1000 recipes, but have you ever used the stalks as a “separate” vegetable? I’ll admit, I usually compost them or save them as scraps for broth. However, I’ve discovered that they add a layer of texture and flavor entirely different without having to use a separate vegetable.

Rice on The Plant Paradox

There are 3 good rice options you can use to accompany your delicious chicken & broccoli: cauliflower rice, shirataki rice, and Indian white basmati rice (with stipulations). Cauliflower and shirataki rice are the safest. Low in starch and even lower in lectins, they are 100% keto friendly.

–> Check out my other keto-friendly recipes:

White Basmati rice from India is allowed in extreme moderation because 1) the lectin-full hull is removed (unlike brown rice) and 2) it contains the most amount of resistant starch when prepared properly (see below). (2) If you have been lectin-free for at least 6 weeks and your health issues have resolved, this recipe is a rare occasion where I’d use real, honest-to-God rice. I suggest a certified USDA organic brand like this one from Amazon.

How to Increase Resistant Starch in White Rice

Time needed: 1 day.

The resistant starch in raw rice is destroyed by cooking. However, the following method recreates a different type of resistant starch (type 3) that results in a lower glycemic response.

  1. Pressure cook the rice.

    Pressure cook 2 cups of white Indian Basmati rice with 3 cups of water on High for 4 minutes. Then use the Natural Pressure Release method (on an Instant Pot).

  2. Cool.

    Let the rice cool and store in the fridge overnight, ideally. This allows the retrograded resistant starch granules to form.

  3. Gently reheat.

    Gently reheat the rice by placing in a saucepan with a splash of water. Cover and cook over low heat until heated through, stirring occasionally to break up the larger clumps.

  4. Enjoy with healthy fats and vegetables.

    Serve your reheated rice with lectin-free starchy or non-starchy veggies and plenty of healthy fats.

Pressure cooking on the Plant Paradox diet

–> Use coupon code LECTINFREEMAMA at the Instant Pot Online Store to get $10.00 off my favorite Instant Pot (plus free shipping!)

Chicken & Broccoli Stir Fry

Knockoff Chinese takeout chicken & broccoli stir fry, compliant for the Plant Paradox diet.

Pastured chicken in a tasty garlic & ginger marinade, stir-fried with broccoli crowns and stems. A delicious lectin-free stir fry to replace typical Chinese takeout.

PREP TIME 5 MINUTES TOTAL TIME 30 MINUTES SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

TOSS the chicken with the scallions, half the garlic and ginger, coconut aminos, sweetener, arrowroot starch, 1 teaspoon salt, dry sherry, and 1 tablespoon sesame oil. Marinate at room temperature for 15 minutes.

MEANWHILE, heat 1 tablespoon avocado oil over high heat in a large nonstick skillet or wok. Add the broccoli stems, and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the florets, the remaining garlic and ginger, 2 tablespoons water, ¼ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste. Stir-fry until broccoli is bright green and crisp, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

HEAT the remaining avocado oil. Add the chicken and marinade, and stir-fry until chicken is browned, about 3 minutes. Return the broccoli to the pan and toss to combine. Stir in ¼ cup water to thin. Season with salt and pepper and serve over rice.

Printable Recipe

Chinese Chicken & Broccoli Stir Fry

Pastured chicken in a tasty garlic & ginger marinade, stir-fried with broccoli crowns and stems. A delicious lectin-free stir fry to replace typical Chinese takeout.

Course Main Course
Cuisine Chinese, phase 2, phase 3
Keyword broccoli, chinese food, stir fry, takeout
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 people
Author lectinfreemama

Ingredients

  • 3/4 pound pastured chicken breast cubed
  • 3 scallion whites thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic minced and divided
  • 1 inch peeled fresh ginger minced and divided
  • 2 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1 tablespoon golden monkfruit sweetener
  • 1 tablespoons arrowroot starch
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoons dry sherry
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 3 tablespoons avocado oil divided
  • 2 broccoli crowns cut into florets
  • 2 broccoli stalks trimmed and sliced
  • Cauliflower, shirataki, or Indian basmati rice for serving

Instructions

  1. TOSS the chicken with the scallions and half the garlic and ginger, coconut aminos, sweetener, arrowroot starch, salt, dry sherry, and 1 tablespoon sesame oil. Marinate at room temperature for 15 minutes.
  2. MEANWHILE, heat 1 tablespoon avocado oil over high heat in a large nonstick skillet or wok. Add the broccoli stems, and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the florets, the remaining garlic and ginger, 2 tablespoons water, ¼ teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste. Stir-fry until broccoli is bright green and crisp, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a plate.
  3. HEAT the remaining avocado oil. Add the chicken and marinade, and stir-fry until chicken is browned, about 3 minutes. Return the broccoli to the pan and toss to combine. Stir in ¼ cup water to thin. Season with salt and pepper and serve over rice.

Recipe Notes

Vegetarians/Vegans: Sub grain-free tempeh or Quorn chick’n tenders (vegetarian) for the chicken.

Indian basmati rice is phase 3 only–if using, pressure cook, cool, and reheat before serving to maximize resistant starch.

Sources

  1. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/09540100220137655
  2. http://www.foodandnutritionjournal.org/volume2number2/estimation-of-resistant-starch-content-of-selected-routinely-consumed-indian-food-preparations/
  3. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/star.201000099
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26693746

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